Green Grass and High Tides Forever-Coastal Impressions Part 3 of 5

Tybee Island, Georgia, just six nautical miles from Hilton Head, presents a quiet, folksy charm, with the underlying strength of a community that has endured, and will continue to endure.  A bit isolated, one knows that the people that inhabit and visit the island want to be there.

The drive from Savannah offers visual delight.  The route meanders over bridges spanning tidal creeks and rivers, winding lazily through grassy marshes.  I cannot mark the exactly difference from my home region; perhaps the waters are a bit murky, seem to hold a hint of mystery,  unlike the brackish taupe waters of The Tidewater.  The marsh grasses possess a blue undertone that is very different than the cheerful yellow green of home.  A charming nature walk lined with palm trees runs parallel to a long stretch of causeway.

On the island, we found a sleepy little town with unpretentious beach cottages and quirky little stores and restaurants.  Despite a turn of gloomy weather, we were quite at ease rambling on the white beaches.  The sea was foamy and green; the surf-line appeared as dripping with a fine lace trim. The wind kicked up, sending volleys of sand flurries up and over the battery, Fort Severn.  However, we somehow possessed a certain languid tolerance under fire.  We eventually did seek respite from from the stinging sands in the ramshackle open-air seaside grill snuggled cozily next to the battery, with the stalwart Tybee Lighthouse standing sentinel.

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I do not own the images used in this blog unless specified. They belong to the originating photographer or source.

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